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CD Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms
Sonaten für Violoncello und Klavier
Sechs Liedtranskriptionen

The Mürzzuschlag Brahms Museum’s "Brahms Piano"

Johann Baptist Streicher & Son

Fol­low­ing Johannes Brahms’ advice, in Octo­ber 1881 Richard and Maria Fellinger bought a black grand piano from the cel­e­brat­ed piano man­u­fac­tur­ing firm of Emil Stre­ich­er.

Brahms was intro­duced to the Fellinger fam­i­ly by Clara Schu­mann in 1881. Over the next few years, this acquain­tance­ship grew into a deep friend­ship. The Fellingers and Brahms spent the sum­mer of 1885 togeth­er in Mürz­zuschlag, and Brahms became a reg­u­lar guest at the Fellinger res­i­dence, the Aren­berg palais, in Wien Erd­berg.

Between 1882 and 1885 Brahms played no few­er than thir­ty house con­certs at the Fellinger’s on the Stre­ich­er grand piano with renowned friends and col­leagues includ­ing cel­list Robert Haus­mann, clar­inetist Richard Mühlfeld, vio­lin­ist Maria Sol­dat-Roeger, singer Her­mine Spies and the Joachim Quar­tet. In 1889 Brahms record­ed the only acoustic record of his play­ing on the Stre­ich­er grand using an Edi­son wax cylin­der acquired by Robert Fellinger.

In par­tic­u­lar, Brahms often per­formed both his sonatas for cel­lo and piano at the Fellinger’s with the cel­list of the famous Joachim Quar tet, Robert Haus­mann. He even pub­licly per formed the 2nd Cel­lo Sonata in F Major, Op. 99 on the Stre­ich­er grand at the Fellinger’s in a house con­cert sev­er­al days pri­or to its offi­cial pre­miere in the Musikvere­in of Vien­na. In Richard Fellinger’s book, “Mem­o­ries of Brahms” (pub­lished in 1997 by the Brahms Muse­um Mürz­zuschlag and revised by Imo­gen Fellinger), his rela­tion­ship with Brahms is described with great feel­ing. Dr. Imo­gen Fellinger, the great-niece and last direct descen­dent of Brahms’ friends, Richard and Maria Fellinger, donat­ed this unique instru­ment to the Brahms Muse­um.

Piano builder Gert Hech­er (www.hecherpiano.com) skill­ful­ly restored the Stre­ich­er grand in 2002. The cross strung, 2.4 meter long piano “Nr. 8105” with Vien­nese action and a forged iron frame­work was man­u­fac­tured in 1880 by the firm Emil Stre­ich­er. It is on exhib­it at the Brahms Muse­um, and is played reg­u­lar­ly dur­ing muse­um con­certs.
In the inter­est of pre­serv­ing the over­tone-rich sound char­ac­ter­is­tic of the Stre­ich­er grand, record­ing engi­neer Ernst Frei­hoff used an ORTF record­ing tech­nique and close­ly placed micro­phones. Record­ed from a sin­gle loca­tion, this cre­ates a sound expe­ri­ence sim­i­lar to hear­ing a live per­for­mance while seat­ed in a con­cert hall. Play­ing the two Brahms cel­lo sonatas, par­tic­u­lar­ly on this Stre­ich­er grand with Vien­nese action cre­ates an inter­est­ing chal­lenge for the pianist.

This chal­lenge, as well as Brahms’ 175th birth­day in 2008 inspired these record­ings in the “Kun­sthaus” in Mürz­zuschlag. Ronald Fuchs and Chan­da Van­der­Hart play, in addi­tion to the two cel­lo sonatas, six Brahms lieder tran­scrip­tions in their orig­i­nal keys. The lieder select­ed have a spe­cial con­nec­tion to both the Stre­ich­er piano and with Mürz­zuschlag itself. Brahms played sever­el of them, includ­ing “Wie Melo­di­en zieht es mir” with Her­mine Spies, and com­posed both “Sap­phis­che Ode” and “Der Tod, das ist die küh­le Nacht” dur­ing his time in Mürz­zuschlag.

The Mürzzuschlag Brahms Museum’s "Brahms Piano"

Manufactured by Johann Baptist Streicher & Son

Fol­low­ing Johannes Brahms’ advice, in Octo­ber 1881 Richard and Maria Fellinger bought a black grand piano from the cel­e­brat­ed piano man­u­fac­tur­ing firm of Emil Stre­ich­er.

Brahms was intro­duced to the Fellinger fam­i­ly by Clara Schu­mann in 1881. Over the next few years, this acquain­tance­ship grew into a deep friend­ship. The Fellingers and Brahms spent the sum­mer of 1885 togeth­er in Mürz­zuschlag, and Brahms became a reg­u­lar guest at the Fellinger res­i­dence, the Aren­berg palais, in Wien Erd­berg.

Continue reading about the Brahms piano on the second tab on this page

Chan­da Van­der­Hart, Piano
Johann Bap­tist Stre­ich­er & son, Vien­na 1880
Ronald Fuchs, Cel­lo
Gio­van­ni Bat­tista Gaibis­so, Alas­sio 1911

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Brahms Muse­um Wiener Straße 4, A-8680 Mürz­zuschlag
Tel.: +43/3852 3434  www.brahmsmuseum.at | info@brahmsmuseum.at

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Johannes Brahms: Sonatas for Cello and Piano - Chanda VanderHart & Ronald Fuchs

Chanda VanderHart & Ronald Fuchs: Johannes Brahms. Sonatas for cello and piano - Six lieder transcriptions

Johannes Brahms

Sonata for cello and piano in e minor, Op. 38

1 Alle­gro non trop­po  .….….….…..15:20
2 Alle­gret­to qua­si Menuet­to .…..06:08
3 Alle­gro .….….….….….….….….……07:30

Sonata for cello and piano in F Major, Op. 99

4 Alle­gro vivace  .….….….….….……08:53
5 Ada­gio affet­tu­oso .….….….….….06:53
6 Alle­gro pas­sion­a­to .….….….….….08:14
7 Alle­gro molto .….….….….….….…..05:03

Six lieder transcriptions for cello and piano

8 »Der Tod, das ist die küh­le Nacht« Op. 96 Nr. 1 .…..02:21
9 »Wie Melo­di­en zieht es mir« Op. 105 Nr. 1 .….….……02:03
10 »Sap­phis­che Ode« Op. 94 Nr. 4 .….….….….….….….….02:12
11 »Meine Liebe ist grün« Op. 63 Nr. 5  .….….….….….…01:40
12 »Liebe­streu« Op. 3 Nr. 1 .….….….….….….….….….….….02:04
13 »An eine Aeol­sharfe« Op. 19 Nr. 5  .….….….….….……03:30

Total time .….….…… 71:58

Pre­miere record­ing of the Brahms Muse­um “Brahms piano”
Mfg Johann Bap­tist Stre­ich­er & Son 1880
Record­ed from July 25th–28th, 2008 in the “Kun­sthaus” Mürz­zuschlag
Record­ing Engi­neer: Ernst Frei­hoff
Sound Engi­neer: Andreas Schuh­mann
Graph­ic design: Michael Glet­thofer, Michael Murschetz
Trans­la­tion: Chan­da Van­der­Hart